Tacoma Home and Garden Show notes

Sustainable Rose Growing – Variety selection is the key to success

Elena Williams – Master Consulting Rosarian

Evergreen Rosarian, my blog

American Rose Society rose.org

Regional: PNWdistrict.org

Local: tacomarosesociety.org

 

Location considerations: near coast, foothills, east of the Cascades

Soil composition

Sand, wind…
Soil pH 6.0-6.5

Compost and mulch

 

Sustainable generally means we want roses that are disease resistant

Resistant to what? Fungi – Green Cure organic fungicide

 

Black spot
Bottom up

 

Powdery mildew
top down

 

Downy mildew
top down

 

Botrytis

August dew on blooms

 

Roses with known disease resistance in my gardens

 

Knock Out -Radler

Kordes – Roses from Germany

‘Artistry’ HT

‘Dick Clark’ GR

‘Easy Does It’ FL

‘Francis Meilland’ HT light pink to white

‘Hot Cocoa’ FL

‘Sunshine Daydream’ GR light yellow

 

David Austin shrub roses: ‘Graham Thomas’ ‘Abraham Darby’

Old Garden Roses     before 1865
Roses respond to fertilizer

Water during PNW Drought months June, July, August

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Blind shoots on some roses

This has been one late rose growing season in Western Washington. Last year my first bloom was April 20, 2016 and this year we are at least three weeks past that date and my garden is seeing a lot of very tight buds and blind shoots. I went out during a brief dry period to capture a few images to help you understand. Paul Zimmerman wrote the following for Fine Gardening magazine: A blind shoot is a stem that grows and grows but a flower never appears at the end of it. There are a few reasons why this happens. The most common one is a late frost in spring that kills the tiny rose buds before they can fully form. Other causes can be lack of nutrients, shortage of light and tiny midges.

In my garden It could have been late frost or shortage of light this spring. We have broken many records for excess rainfall/lack of sunshine. The rose variety in the photos is ‘Whirlaway’.