Rose propagation

Let me start this discussion by pointing out that some roses are protected by plant patents. David Austin roses and many Weeks modern varieties fall in this category. It is illegal to propagate roses with plant patents. The large rose producers need to protect their investments in roses with plant patents. That said, many old garden roses, polyanthas and miniature roses do not have plant patents. Do your research before propagating roses.

I am not into budding onto rootstock, but I have had modest success with starting hardwood cuttings in fall. I credit my success to the continual rain in the Pacific Northwest providing the outdoor moisture. My method is simple: hardwood cuttings, rooting hormone powder and small potting mix filled containers. Roots form within two months but the starts will not be potted up until  next summer or fall.

Hardwood cuttings 10/9/16 (left) and  hardwood cuttings fall 2015. (Right)

My once blooming mystery rose

Six years ago, Orion Roses in Minnesota had a going out business sale and I purchased several roses thinking this one was ‘Celestial’. It is not pink or ‘Celestial’ but since they business is gone, I have no idea what the identity of the rose is. It is quite large, drops it’s petals cleanly and forms oval hips and fills a space but I wanted a re-blooming rose in this location. Do you recognize this rose?

The first roses of 2016

Every year we prune and fertilize and wait for the blooms to begin. Every Spring I am surprised by the special blooms that begin my rose growing season. Perhaps they are not the best blooms that will grow in my garden, but they do get all my attention because they are the first after a long, wet winter.

Large pink bloom was sold as ‘Louise Odier’ but has been questioned on a Facebook page. What do you think? Is this what your ‘Louise Odier’ looks like?

The single form bloom is rosa damacina macrophylla.