Rosarian at a crossroad

This gardening season I have been thinking about my rose growing hobby a lot. I like rose horticulture exhibiting, making arrangements and growing the miniature and miniflora roses and I am moderately successful, especially since the move from the short growing season in Minnesota to western Washington. To do really well, a person needs some type of florist frig or other not frost-free frig that will stay at 36* F to hold roses for a week or so before a show. It will keep a perfect bloom in that state for days until needed. All the really good rose exhibitors have a special frig. I do not have such a frig. The frig really only needs to be using electricity for a month or so in June then a month in Sept. to cover all the rose shows in the Pacific Northwest. So I have been wondering, do I want to get such a frig? Do I want to continue showing roses at this level? How many more years would I really want to be showing roses? Would it be worth the effort? What do I really get out of all this? Heaven knows I don’t need more trophies and stuff. I like the recognition and thrill of getting on the head table. I only need one up there for it to be a success. I like being with rose people and judging. Judging is where the real action is, IMHO. So I am conflicted. I like my humble shrub roses with their full fluffy variety of colors. They are not show roses for the most part. Dr. Buck and David Austin are well represented in my rose collection. I am also trying a few of the Kordes varieties this year because of their reputation for disease resistance. So where does this bring me? I will probably continue life without a frig, but I would take one if it magically appeared.

Top row L to R:Honey Perfume, April Moon, Joy a miniature show rose on its second flush, Lena, a cute shrub born in Minnesota.

Bottom: Serendipity and Aunt Honey by Griffin Buck.

2016 PNW district rose show

Competition roses in the Pacific Northwest are amazing! I recently returned from Vancouver, WA where I participated in the American Rose Society, Pacific Northwest District rose show. There were two main categories of competition: Horticulture and Arrangements. In horticulture, the hybrid tea rose is always the top winner and is awarded Queen, King, Princess. (I like that Queen is the best 😀) My favorite competition has always been making arrangements according to the guidelines of the American Rose Society. I still get a kick out of growing the roses and doing something pretty with them. Being recognized by my peers for good work is great too. It was a satisfying rose show for me.  
I won the PNW trophy for my Oriental free style, naturalistic design using two containers. The roses are the David Austin variety ‘Graham Thomas’.

copyright Elena Williams

I was awarded a blue ribbon for a miniature mass design (10 inches). The roses are ‘Jeanne Lajoie’. I made several other designs winning blue and red ribbons.

copyright Elena Williams

My once blooming mystery rose

Six years ago, Orion Roses in Minnesota had a going out business sale and I purchased several roses thinking this one was ‘Celestial’. It is not pink or ‘Celestial’ but since they business is gone, I have no idea what the identity of the rose is. It is quite large, drops it’s petals cleanly and forms oval hips and fills a space but I wanted a re-blooming rose in this location. Do you recognize this rose?

Warm sunny weather needed

My first flush of roses is nearly over, but with the temps in the 50’s and 60′ for highs, the rebloom is moving slowly this year. Our Pacific Northwest District rose show will be Saturday June 4th down in Vancouver, WA and I need some sunny warm weather to compete! 

Here are today’s blooms from the first flush of some of my Austin shrub roses. 

‘Abraham Darby’

‘Graham Thomas’

‘Munstead Wood’

‘Darcey Bussell’

‘Strawberry Hill’

Deadheading already

Being outside in the fresh air and sunshine is my time to think. This year I have been thinking that my roses are blooming ahead of schedule but actually that is not the case it is just that last year my garden suffered through a nasty period of downy mildew and I had to do a second spring pruning to get rid of the diseased leaves and canes, so it felt that my roses bloomed late in 2015 and now early in 2016. They are looking fabulous now during my first flush. The roses below from top left are ‘Darcey Bussel’ ‘Boscobel’ bottom: ‘Prairie Sunrise’ ‘Show Stopper’ and ‘Mutabalis’.

The first roses of 2016

Every year we prune and fertilize and wait for the blooms to begin. Every Spring I am surprised by the special blooms that begin my rose growing season. Perhaps they are not the best blooms that will grow in my garden, but they do get all my attention because they are the first after a long, wet winter.

Large pink bloom was sold as ‘Louise Odier’ but has been questioned on a Facebook page. What do you think? Is this what your ‘Louise Odier’ looks like?

The single form bloom is rosa damacina macrophylla.

 

Rose Garden at Point Defiance

We all have favorite places and this one is close to my heart. The wonderful people of the Tacoma Rose Society deadhead every Thursday and this year it is looking super!

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‘Blueberry Hill’ and ‘Elina’ are featured roses.

Buck roses at Heirloom

I love the display gardens at Heirloom Roses in St. Paul, OR. The gardens feature many types of roses including extensive collections of miniatures, Austin’s and Buck roses. I think Heirloom has the nicest collection of Buck roses I have ever seen in one place. St. Paul, OR is farm country and the display gardens are down a winding road but getting there is well worth the effort.

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